Tag: homeless

Homeless No More

Here at Associated Ministries we do more than just help clients that come to us looking for housing and other assistance. Each staff member and intern who deals with case management and intake, also offer hope as well as encouragement to those who so desperately need it. This sometimes comes from a place of experience as multiple staff and interns have experienced homelessness themselves in the past.

One such person, who we will call “Alicia Jones”, has agreed to be interviewed and share her story in the hopes that it will help to educate on what we do here at AM on a daily basis.

Chelsea Gitzen: How did you become homeless?

Alicia Jones: “I became homeless because I walked out on domestic violence. The violence began four days into living together, but I stuck it out for 6 months until the end of my lease. It was bad and I decided being homeless was better.”

CG: What were the first days of being homeless like?

AJ: “I will never forget that experience, especially the first few days. I was moving my car every hour or two and wasn’t sleeping at all. I was and still am always looking over my shoulder looking for his car.”

CG: Where did you find help?

AJ: “There’s too many people needing temporary housing therefore it doesn’t exist anymore. There are so many more people that need housing than what is available and the prices keep going up every week. The staff at Nativity House were the most helpful where they have 3 meals, an art room, games, a place to hang out and air conditioning, the WorkSource staff helped me get a job and new skills, as well as the Metropolitan Development Council building where I could get a hot shower, do laundry and receive medical care – it was the greatest thing.”

CG: Why are you sharing your story?

AJ: “While the resources I were able to access were incredibly helpful, there are gaps in services and lack of availability. There are simply not enough to go around based on the need of our community and I am hoping to help spread the word of the needs of people who were in my situation. Another issue that people experiencing homelessness can have to deal with is injury. During the time I was homeless I was injured and discovered the world is made for people who do not have difficulty walking. It was very eye-opening and shows me we’re still a long way to making places really accessible for people with disabilities.”

CG: Can you share more of what life was like before you became homeless?

AJ: ““I would describe my life before as really solid and safe. I lived in subsidized housing for almost a decade and before that I had owned a house. I was working in customer service and finance and my job skills were up-to-date and I had a great deal of work experience.

CG: What is life like now?

AJ: “I am thankful to have a temporary job and gaining updated and new job skills and experience through my internship with Associated Ministries. The program I am in has allowed me to take some computer, finance and other classes through Goodwill. I am enjoying the work I do, helping identify affordable housing for clients who are looking for a second chance just like I was. I also reach out to landlords who are willing to work with people who have barriers that are keeping them from finding a place to live. I am also learning about more resources we have to offer through the different programs of Associated Ministries and in our community. And I am now living in a place of my own!”

CG: You have persevered through it all, do you have additional thoughts you would like to share?

AJ: “I will never forget the lessons I learned during my time experiencing homelessness. My words of advice to anyone experiencing domestic violence and/or homelessness themselves is being positive will lead you to better things. If you keep being sad your world will get smaller. So keep yourself up because great things are going to happen, you just have a little while to get there.”

Meet David Alger

Editorial Note: The article below was written by an Associated MinistriesNext Move intern in conjunction with two other Next Move interns. Associated Ministries was pleased to host three students from the Tacoma Public Schools. This students added to our agency with their new ideas, creativity and passion. The interns, Amaya Fox, Ella Banken and Tyreke Wilbanks were an integral part of helping write stories, research historic documents and add to our photo library to help us tell the story of Associated Ministries. Their final project, which was conducted as a joint interview, was with long-time Executive Director, Reverend David Alger. We hope you enjoy their work!

Reverend David Alger Interview by Amaya Fox

Reverend Dave Alger is a man who needs no introduction around Tacoma and Pierce County. As the former Executive Director of Associated Ministries for nearly thirty years, Alger has created a lasting impact on not only Associated Ministries, but also on the Tacoma community.

In his time as Executive Director, Alger was instrumental in the founding and development of many programs that sought to build a better Tacoma such as the Pierce County AIDS Foundation, the Moments of Blessing services, interfaith meetings, and the Hilltop Action Coalition.

Alger and interns 2I, along with fellow interns Ella Banken and Tyreke Wilbanks, was lucky enough to sit down with Rev. Alger for an hour and talk to him about his time as Executive Director and how AM was vital in the development of Tacoma, specifically the Hilltop community.

We discussed the idea of interfaith and the true meaning behind it, as it has been, and still is, such a prominent aspect of what is done at AM. In Alger’s perspective, the essential things necessary to effectively become an interfaith organization are “time, energy, and a willingness to accept the validity of other groups.” He goes on to say how, especially as Executive Director, he had to learn how to “roll with various religious customs and deal with the radical differences.” To him, interfaith means nothing without “honest, trusting relationships,” which is exactly what he strove to create in his time as Executive Director.

The Moments of Blessing are another effective service brought to Tacoma by Alger. He originally got the idea from a similar movement happening in Indianapolis and took it into his own hands; crafting it into a moving and spiritually uplifting program. In short, a Moment of Blessing is a service designed to reclaim a space where a homicide has occurred. It has become one of AM’s most effective and well-known programs to date. Alger strived to “work to involve people and show people how to be involved,” with such a rare opportunity to touch people’s hearts. “They are very, very moving and powerful times of healing.”

To begin getting involved in the Hilltop community, Alger made the decision to relocate AM right into the middle of Hilltop, in a time where gang violence was no stranger to the community. The move in his eyes “was a statement that we were committed to the city” and the building of a safer Tacoma, although the move initially did raise many safety concerns. This controversial decision was one of many that paid off immensely for AM and Hilltop, bringing the two together in a way that could not have been done otherwise.

Reverend Dave Alger, I’ve learned, is one of those people whom you could just sit down with for as little as ten minutes and think to yourself, “wow, I should be doing more to help the community.” He is an inspiration to many and a motivator for all. He encompasses the mission behind AM and all that it stands for in a way that no other person quite has, and for that Tacoma and Pierce County are forever thankful.  

Community Meeting on Homelessness in Pierce County

As evidenced here http://thesubtimes.com/2016/04/30/unsheltered-homelessness-up-37-in-pierce-county/ and in other articles, Pierce County, like many communities along the West Coast, is experiencing higher numbers of people who are unsheltered.  In response, Pierce County Community Connections and the Corporation for Supportive Housing (www.csh.org) are hosting a weeklong Charrette to hear from experts and hold a community wide discussion on solutions to the issue of people who are homeless and sleeping outside. 

I’d like you to be part of this process by attending one of the day long sessions. One is in Tacoma – on June 21; the other is in Parkland – on June 22. The topics at each will be the same (see attachments for details). You can participate all day or you may choose to attend the session that most suits your interests. Additionally, CSH will be facilitating a feedback session at Bates Technical College 1101 S Yakima Ave, Tacoma from 10:00 to 11:30 on Friday June 24th to provide draft recommendations from the two days of discussion.  

Tuesday, June 21st, 2016
9am-5pm
Bates Technical College
1101 S Yakima Ave, Tacoma, WA 98405
9-9:30 Introduction – Homelessness in Pierce County
9:30-11:30 Permanent & temporary housing options
12:30-2:30 Services including outreach and engagement
3-5 Maximizing Community Resources

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016
9am-5pm
Pierce County Library Admin Building
2005 112th St E, Tacoma, WA 98466
9-9:30 Introduction – Homelessness in Pierce County
9:30-11:30 Permanent & temporary housing options
12:30-2:30 Services including outreach and engagement
3-5 Maximizing Community Resources

The Charrette is a process that allows for a wide variety of people from different backgrounds and experiences to understand the scope of the problem and come together for solutions. CSH uses a modified fishbowl process to ensure maximum participation among diverse stakeholders. Key experts will have a conversation that will set the stage for a larger group discussion. More information on Charrettes is available here: http://www.csh.org/csh-solutions/community-work/local-planning/charrette-workshops/ .

Space will be limited at each site, so please RSVP as soon as possible to nui.bezaire@csh.org. Light snacks will be offered in the morning and the afternoon, however lunch is on your own. 

 Your participation will make the conversation richer – I hope you can join us.

Pierce County Charrette Flyer June 21-22_Page_1

Pierce County Charrette Flyer June 21-22_Page_2

Community Meeting on Homelessness in Pierce County

As evidenced here http://thesubtimes.com/2016/04/30/unsheltered-homelessness-up-37-in-pierce-county/ and in other articles, Pierce County, like many communities along the West Coast, is experiencing higher numbers of people who are unsheltered.  In response, Pierce County Community Connections and the Corporation for Supportive Housing (www.csh.org) are hosting a weeklong Charrette to hear from experts and hold a community wide discussion on solutions to the issue of people who are homeless and sleeping outside. 

I’d like you to be part of this process by attending one of the day long sessions. One is in Tacoma – on June 21; the other is in Parkland – on June 22. The topics at each will be the same (see attachments for details). You can participate all day or you may choose to attend the session that most suits your interests. Additionally, CSH will be facilitating a feedback session at Bates Technical College 1101 S Yakima Ave, Tacoma from 10:00 to 11:30 on Friday June 24th to provide draft recommendations from the two days of discussion.  

Tuesday, June 21st, 2016
9am-5pm
Bates Technical College
1101 S Yakima Ave, Tacoma, WA 98405
9-9:30 Introduction – Homelessness in Pierce County
9:30-11:30 Permanent & temporary housing options
12:30-2:30 Services including outreach and engagement
3-5 Maximizing Community Resources

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016
9am-5pm
Pierce County Library Admin Building
2005 112th St E, Tacoma, WA 98466
9-9:30 Introduction – Homelessness in Pierce County
9:30-11:30 Permanent & temporary housing options
12:30-2:30 Services including outreach and engagement
3-5 Maximizing Community Resources

The Charrette is a process that allows for a wide variety of people from different backgrounds and experiences to understand the scope of the problem and come together for solutions. CSH uses a modified fishbowl process to ensure maximum participation among diverse stakeholders. Key experts will have a conversation that will set the stage for a larger group discussion. More information on Charrettes is available here: http://www.csh.org/csh-solutions/community-work/local-planning/charrette-workshops/ .

Space will be limited at each site, so please RSVP as soon as possible to nui.bezaire@csh.org. Light snacks will be offered in the morning and the afternoon, however lunch is on your own. 

 Your participation will make the conversation richer – I hope you can join us.

Pierce County Charrette Flyer June 21-22_Page_1

Pierce County Charrette Flyer June 21-22_Page_2

Point In Time Survey: Spending the Day With Tacoma’s Homeless

Highlights

  • Point In Time Survey de-briefing occurred last week on Wednesday, February 10th, 2016
  • Annual Point In Time Survey occurred January 29th, 2016
  • Preliminary rough estimate of 23% increase in unsheltered surveys in 2016 compared to 2015 (duplicates have not been removed yet making this estimate unofficial)

 

City planning officials, University of Washington Tacoma students and faculty participate in the Point In Time Survey's de-briefing and feedback meeting February 10th, 2016 at Pierce County Community Connections.

City planning officials, University of Washington Tacoma students and faculty participate in the Point In Time Survey’s de-briefing and feedback meeting February 10th, 2016 at Pierce County Community Connections. (Photo Credit/Chelsea A.)

Point In Time Survey: Spending the Day With Tacoma’s Homeless
by Chelsea A.

For the thousands of people experiencing homelessness and living in our county, it’s more than just a struggle to live from day to day in such a cold-to-the-bone, wet-all-of-the-time environment. It’s a constant battle simply to stay alive. For the hundreds of volunteers and employees working with these people on a regular basis, it’s a constant frustration of never having enough resources to be able to house, support or supply everyone. The annual Point In Time Survey is a doorway to find solutions.

Training the Volunteers

It was a typical rainy and cold January 25th Monday night in Tacoma when a large group of us volunteers gathered at the Pierce County building near 38th and Pacific Avenue. The doors were propped open and a hand-written sign read, “Point In Time Orientation.” The room was full to the point where multiple people were standing as our lesson began. Valerie Pettit beamed at the front, undoubtedly excited to have so many turn out in support of the event she is responsible for organizing.

The majority of the volunteers belonged to some sort of local organization currently working with homeless people: REACH Center, Nativity House, the Mission, Coalition to End Homelessness, Associated Ministries and various Pierce County employees. The rest were people who visit tent cities weekly to deliver food and supplies, or people who simply wanted to end homelessness in any way possible.

The Day of the Survey
January 29th was the day of the Point In Time Survey count across the county. When I arrived at the Nativity House for my 11-hour shift, the room was already packed as people gathered for breakfast.

I gathered handfuls of incentive items and displayed them across my make-shift station: hand and foot warmers, shampoo, conditioner, razors, floss, toothpaste, gloves, hats and scarves. I only had a few of each item. Two hours into the volunteers shift and we were already running out. Luckily, Valerie arrived several times with a box full of incentive items that were sure to entice, including coats and clothing items. My pile grew 10 times as large and almost instantly after every delivery I had a line forming at my desk.

Most people begrudgingly took the survey because they needed the items I was dangling in front of them. It seemed cruel but served the purpose of getting them to participate. Without these items as incentive we would have undoubtedly accomplished nothing.

Mental Illness
Throughout the day I spoke to many people with mental illnesses: schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder, agoraphobia. There were several people who couldn’t even bring themselves to speak to me or anyone else, they were so encumbered by the disease they were battling. One gentleman asked to fill out the form on his own, writing the word “stolen” in response to every question. I asked him what had been stolen from him and was met with various profanities. Another woman spoke to the voices she was hearing as we filled out the survey together, adamantly telling me she had not been diagnosed with any kind of mental health problems at any point in her life. She came back many times throughout the day, picking up more items each time.

Unfortunately, I couldn’t help those individuals who couldn’t communicate or who were barely able enough to come to the Nativity House for a hot meal. I tried handing out supplies to them anyway, but they didn’t trust me enough for that either. In most cases I was able to get most people to at least take the survey in whatever way they could and accept the incentive items.

Valerie Pettit, Point In Time Survey event organizer, writes volunteer feedback at the survey's de-briefing and feedback meeting February 10th at Pierce County Community Connections.

Valerie Pettit, Point In Time Survey event organizer, writes volunteer feedback at the survey’s de-briefing and feedback meeting February 10th, 2016 at Pierce County Community Connections. (Photo Credit/Chelsea A.)

Stereotypes of Homelessness
Overall we handed out dozens of coats, items of clothing, toiletries, various things to help them stay warm–and we listened. That’s all we could do, and for some people that’s what they wanted even more than the things we were passing out. Valerie said during our volunteer orientation, “These people are avoided like the plague on a daily basis. We look away, we walk past, we ignore their attempts to ask for help – whether it’s just a little change or a cigarette.” Having someone acknowledge their existence and treat them like a human being meant more to them than anything we could have given them. I lost count how many times I heard something similar to, “Thank you for listening, it’s really made me feel better.”

It’s while we listened to their stories that we realized just how wrong the stereotype of “choosing” to be homeless is.

A middle-aged man, not much older than myself, was receiving disability benefits, but that didn’t cover the cost of his rent, utilities, and the expensive medications he needed just so he wouldn’t be consumed in pain.

One couple had been living in a rented home their entire lives, their children now grown with families of their own. When the husband, the sole bread winner, was laid off from his job, they applied for Section 8 assistance. Their landlord refused to take it–along with every other landlord they approached.

A widow told me how she had raised her family, had been an inspiration to them and her community until the day her husband passed away. She had no work experience or skills to land a job and eventually lost her home and had to live in a shelter with her four children.

A 25-year-old man I met, a year older than the youth housing cutoff, was a veteran who had lost everything due to his health problems. He was experiencing his first week of homelessness and we made recommendations for safe places others had mentioned for sleeping through the night. Like so many we spoke to he spent that cold and rainy night outside.

Another couple–both had lost their jobs–were living out of their car with their young baby. So desperate for even temporary shelter, they planned to move to another city just to find it.

I asked each what their biggest struggle was. While many mentioned getting the basic necessities, others were more affected by the way people treated them. One elderly man recounted, “People treat us like we did something wrong and that’s not right for everyone. I’ve been working full time my entire life and I never did anything wrong, never even went to jail or did drugs. I paid my taxes. After 13 years working for [the same company] they told me thank you for your hard work, but we’re making cutbacks and we have to let you go. It’s as simple as that.”

The only difference between these people and those of us who have homes or steady incomes is happenstance. It doesn’t take much for circumstances to take away everything in the blink of an eye. And when it does, you’re left struggling just to feed yourself and find somewhere to sleep.

I watched my little brother go through the same exact struggles as some of the people I interviewed. He was diagnosed with bipolar paranoid schizophrenia at the age of 25. After members of my family and I tried taking him in, he choose to be homeless. He was listening to the instruction of the voices he was hearing. He cycled in and out of institutions that refused to do anything other than release him with medications which he refused to take once he stepped out of their front doors. After a year of homelessness and at the age of almost 26, the voices won out over the love of his family and he took his own life.

What next?

This count may not be able to reach every homeless person and it may miscategorize those staying with family or friends due to the government’s definition of homelessness. But it does provide a rough estimated of the number of people experiencing homelessness along with demographic details. This number helps us understand how many beds we need, shelters, food banks, and local resources. It may not be a perfect system and there will always be people falling through the cracks, but it is a huge step in the right direction.

For me, this is the first year I volunteered in the survey but it will be one event which I will come back for each year until there are no more people to count.


 

What You Can Do To Help

  • Donate clothing, hats, gloves, scarves, hand/foot warmers, or toiletries for next year’s Point In Time Survey
  • Volunteer to participate and survey people experiencing homelessness in next year’s Point In Time Survey
  • Donate items, funds or your volunteerism to the Nativity House or other local shelters
  • Attend fundraisers this Spring for local nonprofits who support shelters and people experiencing homelessness